Northern Kentucky

Northern Kentucky is right across the river from downtown Cincinnati and is an ideal spot to scope out if you’re looking to move to Cincinnati or the surrounding area. You don't have to be here long to know it's like nowhere you've ever been before -- there's tons of creative businesses and when you walk in, the most hospitable people running them. There's also Blue Ribbon schools, urban living, bluegrass farmland, and landmarks that give nod to its old gangster heritage (make sure to check out the Newport Gangster Tour). It’s close-knit, it’s vibrant, and it’s only a walkable bridge away from all the activity across the river.

Living in Northern Kentucky

You head on over to Lil’s Bagels and answer the question of the week. This time it’s “Who was your first crush?” You tell a stranger through the Walk Up Windough all about your middle school heartthrob and walk away with a new friend. And a really good New York style bagel.

Or maybe you decide to grab coffee at Carabello and choose to sit at the Analog Bar because you have time—and you appreciate craft. You overhear someone talking about the goats that are about to run through the streets, and you’re intrigued.

You spend the day checking out Newport on the Levee. You visit the aquarium, buy a new book, and make a mental note to come back this evening for a film you’ve been dying to see.

You take a ride along the river, driving through adorable small towns like Ludlow, Bellevue, Dayton, and Fort Thomas making mental notes of little shops and parks you’d like to come back and see.

For dinner, you grab a bite at a local dive called KungFood Amer-Asia and walk around the corner to Braxton Brewery where you try a really good craft beer. Okay, two really good craft beers.

You get chatting with some people who just moved here, too. They’re from California and they talk about how Cincinnati’s great and all, but they LOVE telling people from home that they live in Kentucky. And they mean it.

You invite them to see the movie with you tonight, and they say, “Duh. We’d love to.”